Moving for older adults

The activities on this page are specifically for older adults who aren't currently active or who are less physically able to do higher intensity activity. If you are already active, you may find some of these activities more suitable for your ability level.

Two-thirds of people aged over 75 and three out of ten aged 65 to 74 don’t use the internet. So we've created a leaflet which you can download and print out to support older adults who are self-isolating to help them keep moving. Download the leaflet here.

Keeping Well at Home

A guide to help older people stay healthy at home during the COVID-19 lockdown has been published by academics at The University of Manchester. The printed booklet is specifically aimed at older people, many of whom have no access to the internet. Download the leaflet here.

10 Today

Short ten minute routines to get you stretching and moving. There are both online videos that can be followed along and daily radio shows that can be listened to online. Find out more and access the resources here.

The routines will now be broadcast live each morning between 5 and 10am on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra.

Super Six - Exercises to improve your strength and balance

Six simple exercises that can help you stay steady and stronger for longer that can be done at home. Take a look here. You can view also view a series of home exercises to help you stay strong and steady: Take a look here and press play all.

Keep On Keep Up

This new app developed at The University of Manchester will help older adults take control of their health and reduce the high risk of falls during and after Covid-19 lockdown. Download it from the app store here.

‘I CAN’ Active Calendar 2020

Later Life Training have made their new 'habit forming, movement prompting, motivation thought provoking, strength and balance monitoring' 2020 calendar free to download. Please visit their website here.

Make Movement Your Mission

If you are on Facebook, join Bex from Monday 23rd March – Monday 20th April at 8am, midday (noon) and 4pm for a daily 10 minute workouts on the Make Movement Your Mission facebook page. If you want to catch up on movement videos, see Later Life Training’s YouTube channel here.

Shapemaster home exercise videos

These videos aim to support older adults & those with long term health conditions throughout isolation. Physiotherapist Rachel Young talks through exercises that can be performed whilst on the sofa or on the floor. Watch the Shapemaster home based exercise films here.

Sitting Exercises

These exercises done whilst sitting, are a great place to start to build strength and balance. See the exercises here.

Flexibility Exercises

These flexibility exercises can be done at home to help improve your mobility. See the exercises here.

Balance exercises

These simple balance exercises can be done at home to help make you feel more steady in walking and moving. See the exercises here.

Strength exercises

Strength exercises like these can be done at home to improve your lower limb strength. See the exercises here.

Movement for those with Osteoporosis or Osteopenia

You can watch and follow the online videos offered by the Royal Osteoporosis Society – See the exercises here.

Over Fifty Fitness

Rosemary retrained as a personal trainer at the age of 60 and runs physical activity sessions for older adults across Manchester. She is now running Facebook Live activity sessions to keep you moving in your homes. Like her page on Facebook here to join in.

Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP)

The CSP have created a simple set of exercises designed especially for older people to help everyone stay active at home. View the exercises online here.

Support for those with dementia

The coronavirus outbreak has placed a strain on everyone, but especially those of us living with dementia. If you, or a friend or family member, currently live with dementia, this leaflet some simple tips specially created to help make things more manageable. Download the leaflet here. There are also numerous ways to keep moving, there is some guidance from the Alzheimer's Society available here.